The Benefits of Universal Health Care

Is it acceptable for the government to require that each individual in a society pay a small fee in order to save the lives of sick children?

If you answered yes to the question above, then congratulations you believe in some form of socialized health care! The reason why the example above is an example of socialized health care is because each person in the society is giving a small amount of their own personal funds for a service that would be publicly available to all of the dying children. Now just substitute “a small fee” with “a small percentage of your income” and substitute “sick children” with “all members of the population” and you have universal health care.

If you answered no then let me start by saying that you’re heartless and that your lack of compassion is disturbing. However, I would like to ask you yet another question:

If you were the sick child with no money in a society which is abundant in wealth and resources, wouldn’t you wish they gave up a very small amount in order to save your life?

Sometimes it’s helpful to put ourselves in the shoes of others (figuratively, of course) in order to understand their situation. Hopefully, you now believe in the central goal of socialized health care. Now that your emotional side is in favor of universal health care, it is time to convince your rational side. 

Why is universal health care any better? 
  1. Universal health care would save the country billions on a yearly basis.

    Switching the nation to a single-payer system would save the country 1.1 trillion in its first decade according to several sources. This is done by reducing overhead costs in administration. This is also done because a focus on preventative care would allow for diseases to be treated early, which is when it is most cost effective to treat. When individuals lack insurance it forces them to put off treatment until they are extremely ill, which makes it extremely difficult and expensive to treat. Encouraging preventative care would not only allow the country to save billions in curing diseases, it will also allow people to be healthier for longer. When people are healthier for longer, they remain in the workforce more consistently and for more time. This would not only bring wealth to the nation through tax revenue, but there would also be less money going into programs such as unemployment benefits, food stamps, or welfare as many of these people receive from these programs because they are unable to work due to an illness.

  2. Universal health care would place a larger focus on preventative care.

    Due to the extremely high prices of health care, which is mostly due to the lack of socialized health care, many people put off simple disorders until they become much worse and much more expensive to treat. Instead of insurance companies running advertisements for their service it would be even more beneficial if a similar amount of advertisements were used to promote a healthy lifestyle (preferably a vegan one), vaccines, and appropriately timed checkups/tests. The frequent checkups and tests would not only be free, but also heavily encouraged. It is fairly easy to see how an emphasis on preventative care would allow for diseases to be prevented as well as allowing the diseases to be treated when they are most cost effective to treat.

  3. Universal health care may more heavily focus research on finding cures as opposed to only treating the symptoms.

    Because capitalism focuses solely on incentives, it is clear to see that a capitalistic health care society would be more incentivized to have a person remain with a disease and continuously purchase symptom-treating drugs for the remainder of their lives as opposed to a single purchase of a drug that cures.

    For example, imagine that research to find the cure for AIDS would cost 1000 dollars. Imagine there are 2000 people with AIDS and that the pharmaceutical company figures the supply and demand would allow for the sale of this drug to be 1 dollar each. The pharmaceutical company would therefore make a profit of 1000 dollars. However, imagine that the research for a drug to slow down the process of AIDS costs 500 dollars and that the price of these drugs would be 50 cents per month for the remainder of the patient’s life. It is obvious that the pharmaceutical company is incentivized to invest in the latter even though it does not align with the ideal solution. If health care is run solely as a business then it is incentivized to keep people sick. This is the same reason why prisons should not be run in a capitalistic manner, because it encourages a system where rehabilitation does not fully occur and the prisoners return. (But that is a topic for a later post)

  4. Universal health care would eliminate the highest source of bankruptcy in this nation.

    The biggest reason why people file for bankruptcy in the United States are medical bills. The surprising fact about this is that over 70% of those who filed bankruptcy, due to medical expenses, already had some form of insurance! The current health care system we have in place causes the poor and middle class to be in a constant negative spiral of “I can’t pay for extraordinary insurance because I have no money and I have no money because I couldn’t pay for extraordinary insurance.” In other nations with universal health care the rate of bankruptcy due to medical bills is close to zero. Bankruptcy due to illness may still remain, but in much lower quantities than with our current system. Bankruptcy due to illness may still occur because many diseases are currently incurable, but the reason why it will be in lower quantities is because more people will be able to be treated for curable diseases in a universal health care system. This would allow them to reenter the workforce and remain out of bankruptcy. 

  5. Universal health care would encourage entrepreneurship.

    There are currently millions of individuals across the United States with desires to start their own business, but the costs of health care are their biggest deterrent. A recent survey found that there are approximately 3.8 million potential entrepreneurs that have yet to take the next step towards fulfilling their dreams due to the current costs of health care. 

  6. Universal health care is about as American as apple pie.

    The American dream is all about our right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. However, it seems that our lack of universal health care is infringing on these rights. The right to life is heavily infringed on the millions of Americans without health insurance who are only able to receive care when in emergency conditions. Liberty is heavily infringed on the individuals who cannot switch careers or start their own business because the other job may not offer the benefit of health insurance and they could not afford it otherwise. The pursuit of happiness is heavily infringed on the families that lack insurance and live in constant fear of falling ill or not being able to pay for the extremely high price of care in our current system.

  7. Universal health care would allow the United States to have a healthier population.

    Despite being one of the wealthiest nations on the planet, having the best doctors on the planet, and having an abundance in resources, the United States ranks 37th in the world for health care behind almost every industrialized nation. Our average life expectancy is below that of the average industrialized nation, our infant mortality is terrible, our emergency rooms are overcrowded because it is the only place for care that many people receive, and our medicine is not as effective because people wait until it’s too late, yet somehow our costs are the highest of any other nation! If these facts don’t raise any red flags for you, then perhaps you are purposely ignoring the fact that a socialized system of health care is superior.

  8. Universal health care is morally superior to our current system.

    It is easy to see how immoral our current system is by seeing how ineffective it is at providing treatment for those who need it most. It sounds highly immoral that we have an abundance of resources yet we choose to make health care a privilege instead of a public good. We must stop turning our back on the poor and middle class and reform our system immediately.

As you can see universal health care will do much more than just expand health care to everyone, it will also improve our system in the several ways shown above. The power to make the change is in your hands. Call your local congressman and tell them you support universal health care and ask them what they’re doing to make the change. If election season is coming up, then vote for the politician who is in favor of a universal health care system.

Have any objections? Let me know in the comments section below!

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27 Responses

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  1. jmacleod
    Jul 15, 2014 - 05:00 PM

    sorry, by the way it appears that my name is linking to the wrong website, so try http://www.theawesomediaries.wordpress.com

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Jul 15, 2014 - 07:42 PM

      Wonderful site! I just followed you and I look forward to your future post 😀

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  2. jmacleod
    Jul 15, 2014 - 04:49 PM

    Hi Manny, I popped over to your blog quite randomly in my travels (I think via a comment) and I love your site! Thank you for your information and views. It appears we think very much alike, but I’m just too wimpy to say so in everyday life 😀 You are absolutely right and your article is right on the money (if you’ll pardon the pun). Reading it has made me so grateful that we have one of the best healthcare systems in the world and that in my everyday work I never have to worry about how much things cost and ‘insurance’ never crosses my mind. My training is subsidised, top notch and the research we do is dedicated to what is best for the greater population. I never appreciated before how lucky we are. Thanks again!

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Jul 15, 2014 - 07:47 PM

      Thank you so much for the extremely kind words! It always makes me happy knowing that I’m the only rational free-thinking person left in the world haha. Thank you so much for stopping by and letting me know about your great experience with a similar system in another country!
      If you don’t mind me asking, what country are you speaking of? 🙂

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  3. journey2change
    Jul 26, 2014 - 12:50 PM

    Great Points! I am currently in the UK, making the transition to move back to the states. I have been here for 10 years. I just had ACL reconstruction surgery and have had other medical needs here and I have NOTHING bad to say about the service the NHS provides. I work and pay my taxes and am happy to have this free service! No Co-Pays here. Birth Control is FREE. The idea of going back to America without free health care is really scary and seems so WRONG now. Nobody can be refused treatment, so we are paying for these people anyways! And why should the amount of money you can afford to pay out effect the level of medical care you receive? It really is INSANE!

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  4. cherished79
    Aug 03, 2014 - 08:00 AM

    Thanks for following my blog. I live in Canada where our health care system is a bit different ~ we pay very high taxes, however, we reap the benefits for wonderful health care. Wonderful blog, really exciting and unique.

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  5. Kheleya Fahrmann
    Aug 23, 2014 - 11:48 AM

    I live in Canada, where universal health care is a reality (although private clinics also exist). Health care here is run by the provincial governments (analogous to your state governments) but gets some federal funding. My province of Ontario spends 56% of its TOTAL budget on health care costs for Ontario residents. Yes, you read that right: one government department out of hunreds, chews up more than half of all the money the governmetn gets coming in. This creates incessant funding shortages for other things paid for by governmetn in a civilized country. it also forces the government to act like a greedy pig that cares only about picking the pockets of taxpayers, not because the government is full of bad people (it isn’t) but because it’s always starved for cash.

    I talked to a medical student some time ago who told me that, during his entire career as a family doctor, he expected to treat about 30 patients who actually need a doctor, as opposed to a nurse or health care aide. The vast majority of health care dollars spent here in Ontario cover treatment for health issues that are not dangerous, let alone fatal, that can be treated perfectly adequately with home remedies, and that in many cases cannot be helped with medical attention (the flu and colds come to mind). Yet, when seeing a doctor is totally cost-free, there is no incentive to rely on less resource-intensive health care solutions, such as home remedies, so our health care system gets overburdened by what frankly amounts to abuse.

    While it’s tragic when someone who truly does need medical care, is unable to get it because he can’t afford it, I thought that I should point out some drawbacks of universal health care that I and my fellow citizens here in Canada have learned about through experience. Universal health care would not be a panacea, and would cause its own peculiar set of problems if the US government implemented it.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this.

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    • roughguidetolife
      Aug 31, 2014 - 09:09 AM

      good post 😉

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  6. Glenn Hefley
    Nov 17, 2014 - 03:26 AM

    What is wonderfully ironic is that — We’re paying it anyway. Only, that’s not quite true — We’re paying it five times over, anyway. See, when homeless people, or people with no money, or people like the child you offer as example, get sick or injured, they go to the emergency room. The emergency room has to take them. It is against the law for them not to. They are treated, and then released. Now… they can’t pay, and you can’t deduct paychecks or put leans on things for medical bills. Court is an option, but again, with medical bills you have the same problem. So, since this is a problem for the hospitals, caused by federal mandate, the feds of course have money which is sort of a subsidy for medical care. What all this means is, the tax payers pay the bill collectively.

    This is a huge hemorrhaging of tax dollars which purges out of uncontrolled slush funds, with no real control or accountability. We don’t get a report about this. We get a report that says something like Misc. $24billion.

    Something interesting as well. Only mentioning the Affordable Care Act during a poll, yields the highest support (45%), while only mentioning Obamacare yields the lowest support (38%). Support for the law when using the other labels falls in between, at 41%.

    Then.. if you ask “Do you feel that Insurance companies should be required to provide coverage for preexisting conditions? — 82% approval.

    Should there be federal regulation to keep insurance companies from suddenly dropping claims or raising premiums too high? — again upper 70’s approval.

    When you go through what Obama care does, .. every point has an above 65% approval rating as being something that should be done.

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  7. amoafowaa
    Nov 17, 2014 - 07:16 AM

    Lots to learn from here.

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  8. nolavstheworld
    Nov 20, 2014 - 11:36 AM

    Hey, I’m over in the UK and wouldn’t be without our NHS (National Health Service). I don’t miss my National Insurance contributions (taken from my salary every month) and can pop into the doctors whenever I need to. Every member of my family has required either surgery or long-term treatment at some stage, and it never occurs to us that we would have had to pay – or do without! – if we lived elsewhere.
    I have a few friends out in the states, and this issue was one that we never agreed on. I hope plenty of people read you article and get a better understanding of what is being offered – peace of mind!
    Thanks for the follow, by the way. I’ve really enjoyed reading your posts – obviously! Keep it up x

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  9. Steph
    Dec 02, 2014 - 10:48 PM

    thank you for blogging on this issue. I am very passionate about medical care being available for all.

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  10. smross106
    Dec 03, 2014 - 01:16 PM

    Hey. Thanks for following at http://www.towerofbuckets.wordpress.com – I loved this post and hope to write about the same subject soon. As someone who lives in the UK and enjoys the benefits of free healthcare, I can certainly testify to what an amazing system it is, I would point out the economic risks of nationalising such a massive industry. In the UK, the National Health System (NHS) costs the government around £109 billion (about $171 billion) per year, and that cost is rising quickly. So while I am a massive advocate of free healthcare, I would warn any governments reading to think before you nationalise. That said, if there are any governments reading, hi. Stop f**king up the environment, random governments.

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Dec 03, 2014 - 03:41 PM

      HAHAHA that last part was priceless. 😀

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      • smross106
        Dec 04, 2014 - 03:03 AM

        Thanks. It’s how I write (and speak) – lots of preambles, post ambles and mid ambles.

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  11. philstanfield
    Dec 16, 2014 - 08:05 AM

    Hi Manny, thank you for your likes of my posts. What are you up to? Best regards, Phil

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Dec 16, 2014 - 07:35 PM

      I’ve been studying for the final exam in my economics classes, but I always find myself distracted by WordPress haha. 🙂

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  12. philstanfield
    Dec 23, 2014 - 03:54 AM

    Hi Manny, best wishes for this time of the year and I hope you have a highly productive New Year! Regards, Phil Stanfield

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  13. johndwm
    Jan 06, 2015 - 06:13 PM

    #UniversalHealthCare #USA #UK http://wp.me/p2120g-2pP via @johndwm

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  14. Faizah ♡ αнмє∂
    Jan 06, 2015 - 09:42 PM

    Aaah man, I’m Canadian, and it’s great that we have free health care but we lack doctors. I’m pursuing medicine, if God wills, and I want to work in the States (I’m American as well). It’s so hard to get into medical school here in Canada, the pay is much lower, and if you study abroad, it’s hard to get a job here. Like what are they doing/:

    You’re very knowledgable btw. Bless x

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  15. arabpikachu4wp
    Jan 07, 2015 - 10:04 AM

    I took pleasure in reading your healthcare article and have thought about writing my own article on healthcare.

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  16. John Love
    Jan 17, 2015 - 09:15 AM

    I have not had a chance to read past this article, but I followed you based on this one. I agree with all points, and I applaud you for being talented enough to put it all together so eloquently.

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  17. Dr Rupert Harker
    Jan 23, 2015 - 05:12 PM

    Hi Manny. Thank you for dropping by The Blue Belvoir Gentlemen’s Club. Your fantastic tache has drawn some very positive feedback from the Club Steward, and he has named a cocktail after it. The “Mantache” is 1 measure of gin, 1 vermouth, 1 Bacardi, and if you drink half a dozen, the club will provide complementary kidney dialysis for a week.

    Regarding your excellent article, I have worked in the British National Health Service for 20 years, and am proud to do so.
    However, I would feel prouder if the Government stopped buggering us about and let us get on with our jobs, but that’s public service for you.

    All the best. Pip-pip.

    Rupert

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  18. Zakariya Mohammed
    Jan 27, 2015 - 12:25 AM

    Hey man, thanks a bunch for checking out my blog and being kind enough to like it too. Here in Scotland we have the type of health care you’re speaking about, it seems a bit strange that people would have to pay , on top of their taxes, for a basic human right… Anyways thanks a bunch !

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  19. chattykerry
    Oct 11, 2015 - 04:34 PM

    You are completely right about universal health care. Coming from the UK to the US, there are many things that can be improved (with the UK’ system) and I worked for mental health care non-profits who bridged the gap inexpensively. It is ludicrous that the richest nation in the world doesn’t have a universal health system and not just because of social justice. It is just good economics! Well done.

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  20. Bill Wallace
    Dec 26, 2016 - 08:08 AM

    Unfortunately, Obamacare has been shown not to work here in the United States. The idea is to provide healthcare for all, but it doesn’t work. It will likely increase premiums by 22% in 2017 and is increasing our out -of-control governmental debt to provide subsidies. As of this writing our national debt is hitting 20 Trillion! Until we can find another way, competitive, privatized healthcare is our only solution in our capitalistic society.

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