Reasons Why Marijuana Should Be Legal

The marijuana debate has been going on for quite some time now and slowly, but surely, states are making the right decision to legalize marijuana in some way or another. States have four options when it comes to marijuana: keep it illegal, legalize it for medical purposes, decriminalize marijuana, or fully legalize and regulate the sale of marijuana. Legalizing marijuana is the option which offers the greatest amount of benefits and the reasons are presented below.

Top 5 Reasons Why Marijuana Should Be Legalized

reasons marijuana should be legal

  1. Legalizing marijuana would create a massive amount of jobs.

    Think of the amount of specialty stores that will be opening up across the country once marijuana becomes legal. Each of these stores will be hiring several crew members and managers, but the jobs within the store aren’t the only ones that each store will create. There will also be jobs for the individuals transporting the product, growing the product, enhancing the product, and even researching the many benefits of the product. Each of these jobs will allow for these individuals, which would have been unemployed otherwise, to earn enough money to buy other products which would create even more jobs in the process. This is a classic example of the effects of an expanded economy due to a new product.

  2. Legalizing marijuana would create a safer society.

    Each week across the United States someone probably dies because of marijuana. However, it’s definitely not because they’re using it, but rather because they’re selling it. The effects of marijuana’s prohibition is identical to that of alcohol. In both situations we are placing the product in the hands of the criminal and, in doing so, we are giving them the power. Because marijuana is illegal we are allowing criminals to sell the product at artificially high rates which makes it an extremely lucrative product that criminals are willing to kill for. Nowadays drug cartels have taken up the role of the mafia in the days of alcohol prohibition. These drug cartels and drug dealers are doing whatever it takes to control their neighborhood’s sale of drugs and they are resorting to violence and gang wars in order to accomplish this goal. We are also placing the lives of our police force at risk whenever we make attempts to fight this unnecessary war on drugs. Also, by placing the nonviolent drug dealers and users in prisons we are encouraging them to continue with criminal behavior after finishing their sentence. This is because they are heavily exposed to the criminal mindset while in prison and also because the difficulty to re-enter the workforce, due to a criminal record, causes many individuals to resort to truly malignant crimes.

  3. Legalizing marijuana would save the United States billions of dollars.

    Each year the United States spends billions of dollars funding the war on drugs. All of this money goes to waste because of how detrimental the war on drugs is to our society. This money goes into purchasing an unnecessary amount of weapons and ammo, funding unnecessary drug enforcement missions, paying legal bills for prosecuting nonviolent drug dealers, and the prison expenses for imprisoning more people per capita than any other nation in the world. Also, because drug dealers work under the table they are able to claim unemployment benefits, food stamps, and welfare checks while also making their income from selling drugs. All of these programs, which were designed for the individuals in need of help, are being exploited by drug dealers.

  4. Legalizing marijuana would allow the United States to generate more money.

    If we legalize marijuana then all of the purchases will be appropriately taxed and all of the income from the individuals with these new jobs will also be appropriately taxed. This new tax revenue could easily provide some much needed funding to our public education or any other public program. The savings from legalization as well as the revenue attained from the appropriate taxing of this product could easily fund the majority of a college education of every poor student at a state college.

  5. Marijuana does not pose a health risk.

    Practically all of the health risks once associated with marijuana have yet to be proven. Actually, it seems that the opposite is true. Marijuana seems to have more medical uses than the majority of other drugs on the market. It has anti-inflammatory effects, pain killing effects, calming effects, mood enhancing effects, and can be used to treat the symptoms of several diseases and disorders. The amount of deaths due to an overdose on marijuana is exactly zero. The amount of deaths due to an overdose due to an “innocent” drug such as aspirin is much higher at 7,600 per year. Although it is possible that marijuana could have mild long-term side-effects, this is no reason to place an obviously ineffective ban on the drug. All drugs have side-effects including, but not limited to, caffeine, alcohol, aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol) and many others we consume on a daily basis to fit our needs. The major difference between those drugs and marijuana is its legality, which must change sooner rather than later.

As you can see the legalization and appropriate regulation of marijuana can lead to several benefits which extend much further than the person using the drug. You do not have to be a user of marijuana to understand that it would be beneficial to our country. You also do not have to be a user of this drug in order to advocate for its legalization. I, for example, have never used the drug, but take every opportunity to fight for the rights of those who would like to use it. The power to reform our laws and legalize marijuana is in your hands. Call up your local congressman and tell them you are in favor of the legalization of marijuana.

Have any objections? Let me know in the comments section below!

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52 Responses

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  1. kielokielo
    Jul 11, 2014 - 04:07 AM

    Couldn’t agree more!
    I had an old hippi teacher who made us wrote essays on the same topic in my freshman year. I really like it when it comes to the fore, even though I’m pessimistic about it.
    I read it like I’m on a natural high and by nodding approvingly ^^ Such a nice work you’ve got in this blog!

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Jul 11, 2014 - 08:31 AM

      Haha hippie teachers are the best! I’m very optimistic about the future of this country when it comes to marijuana and I feel like there will be a significant reform within the next 10-20 years. (although I’m sure they said that 10-20 years ago lol)

      Thanks for the kind words and for stopping by! 😀

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  2. Liesje
    Jul 24, 2014 - 06:21 AM

    Although your post is very positive and shows a better light on marijuana I have to say that I am still against the legalization of the product. I am from the Netherlands where the use of marijuana has been legal since 1974 if my memory serves me correctly. Though I do support the jobs of those who both produce and sell marijuana (and prostitution for that matter), the fact that it is legal is something I am not too keen on. Plus in my mind I would think that with the legalization of marijuana in other countries (such as the States) it would minimize tourism for the Dutch. We all know that majority of North Americans lust after coming to the Netherlands to utilize marijuana one way or another so wouldn’t the legalization of the product in the States prevent such travels to our beautiful country? Amsterdam thrives on tourism and when the initial ban went up against selling of marijuana to tourists, the locals raged. Thus breaking the ban, allowing tourists and locals to enjoy as one. But if the States makes this plant legal our levels of tourism will go down severely, right?

    And as a Dutchwoman in the hospitality industry I know that is not a good thing for our country. So I would have to say I am more against the legalization of marijuana in the States than I am against the product itself.

    Sorry.

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    • Will S.
      Jul 24, 2014 - 08:35 AM

      Your tourism is probably already lower this year, what with Colorado and Washington states now having legalized it.

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    • nitromidget
      Aug 14, 2014 - 10:51 PM

      Wouldn’t you think it would be more detrimental to have marijuana be such a leading reason of tourism to your country? To me, that short sells all other beautiful attractions to be found there by focusing on a product, rather than the culture. With legalization here, the Dutch wouldn’t need to be dependent on the marijuana industry as a lure for tourism. There’d be a lull initially, but it would allow different aspects of Dutch culture to rise to the forefront.

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    • MrJohnson
      Aug 23, 2014 - 12:33 PM

      But why are you against legalization in the States? The tourism industry in your country being affected is a really poor reason given the amount of liberation that would result from legalization. That is a really selfish rationale.

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  3. Sugar and Cinnamon
    Jul 19, 2014 - 08:34 PM

    I agree with this 100%! I was a bit on the fence about legalizing marijuana but this has made me realise the benefits far outweigh the possible downfalls.

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Jul 19, 2014 - 09:44 PM

      I’M SO GLAD THIS PERSUADED YOU! 😀
      Thank you so much for the encouraging words and stopping by!

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  4. Will S.
    Jul 23, 2014 - 10:48 PM

    The first four are all very good and compelling reasons; the fifth is not correct – all drugs, even like you say aspirin, or acetaminophen for that matter, bear certain health risks, and while not addictive, cannabis can be habit-forming for some people. But the fact that alcohol is harmful hasn’t stopped us from keeping it legal; ditto caffeine and nicotine, and so there’s no rational reason to treat it differently.

    And I’d change the fifth reason to that: there is no logical reason to treat one kind of central nervous system depressant – alcohol – one way in terms of law, while treating another CNS depressant – cannabis – another way; the only reasons we’ve done so are cultural, not rational.

    Marijuana should be legalized, or at the very least, decriminalized, indeed.

    Cheers. 🙂

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  5. rawjazzie
    Jul 22, 2014 - 04:21 PM

    Hey! Thanks for your positive reaction, and thanks for your amazing view! I live in Amsterdam, and Marihuana is legal here. Of course not everyone uses it, I see it like drinking; its better to do it every now amd then. And when you do that, there’s nothing wrong. That’s a bit how we think about it here. There arent any problems because it’s legal, everyone knows how much they can buy, and because of the fact that it’s legal, you rarely see people with illegal drugs. Why should you? I think it would be a gopd thing (also thinking about al the ‘prevent drugs’ costs) if marihuana became legal! 🙂

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  6. jessjuice
    Jul 20, 2014 - 12:22 AM

    Word. Love it!

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  7. Edgar Swamp
    Aug 04, 2014 - 04:01 PM

    Great article! All very good reasons marijuana should be legalized. The right wing fringe wants everyone to believe it should continue to be a schedule one ‘narcotic’ simply because big tobacco and alcohol companies don’t want the competition. Keep up the good work!

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  8. Bill Wagner
    Aug 23, 2014 - 07:12 PM

    I agree and it’s getting closer all the time. It doesn’t effect anyone except the people using it and it’s a good thing for so many reasons. Thanks for liking my poetry-I truly appreciate it! Bill

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  9. Klaus Jochem
    Nov 16, 2014 - 02:12 PM

    Very well said. In particular the arguments 2 and 3 should convince every politician. Nevertheless there must be clear and strong rules, like those for alcohol, for marijuana consumption.

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  10. Zedd
    Aug 02, 2014 - 07:37 PM

    Its always good to read ‘rational’ comments on cannabis law reform, as opposed to ‘reefer madness’ nonsense & misinformation..
    btw: the fight to end the war on drugs (esp. cannabis) needs to be global effort. “Kia Ora from Aotearoa/NZ”

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  11. fightingfatblogger
    Aug 04, 2014 - 08:04 PM

    I think it should be legalised. I just wonder how that would work in terms of growing your own. I would like to grow my own plant so I know exactly where it came from, what went into it and how it was reared. If it’s legalised and it’s done primarily for economic reasons then the home growing of it will need to be banned or regulated and that will be tough to do. Besides if people are still growing at home they can undercut the government licensed versions and the black market and drug dealer issues will still exist through illegal farms.

    I think the comment about the damage to Dutch tourism is valid but then that’s business and competition, it won’t be the first time a country has had it’s trade snaffled away by another country. I don’t think it’s fair to say we make a lot of money out of this so nobody else should do it, it’s unrealistic, like asking France not to make cars because Germany do it better.

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Dec 06, 2014 - 12:08 PM

      I’m glad you agree and thank you for providing valid points for the issues facing legalization. What many states have done is regulate the amount one can grow in homes to an amount that can be consume on a personal basis. Any amount above this, like you said, could undermine the commercial process done by licensed vendors.

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  12. Stephy83
    Aug 23, 2014 - 10:09 AM

    Firstly, thanks for visiting my blog! Secondly, this post mirrors my own sentiments though I live in the UK. I have recently seen seen very positive amount of news stories about marijuana, or specifically cannabis oils, helping with cancer.

    Love the blog x

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  13. jollof
    Oct 26, 2014 - 07:54 AM

    I like this controversial topic. My concern is whether some people will abuse the privilege of using marijuana legally. I don’t want some dope head knocking me off the sidewalk simply because he thought he could handle driving after a few spliffs. I live in Nigeria where neither speed cameras have not been introduced nor breathalyzer tests are given. Or maybe the effect of legalizing marijuana will be that it would lose it’s appeal when it becomes easily accessible. I love the arguments you put forward and in many ways they all make sense. I just wonder what impact Mari-J legalization will have in Nigeria…fresh air would be a thing of the past!

    Thanks for the read (and the follow).

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  14. naptimethoughts
    Nov 16, 2014 - 02:26 PM

    Jollof, do people abuse the privilege of using alcohol legally? Alcohol is physically addictive, yet it’s legal. Tobacco is harder to give up than Heroin, but it’s legal. Abuse will be abuse no matter what drug is legal. Take a look at Portugal, and their drug policy. People who will smoke will smoke, legal or not.

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  15. dougstuber
    Nov 18, 2014 - 03:05 AM

    Correct. But with a Republican Senate we better hope the white house doesn’t fall,otherwise any gains on this issue wilol be quickly reversed via federal agents, one fears.

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  16. marieea
    Nov 24, 2014 - 12:36 PM

    Totally agree!!!

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  17. liviask
    Nov 27, 2014 - 08:56 AM

    Hey! I would like to follow your blog but it only alowds me to follow in a social midia, I’d like to follow you with my blog.. (that way your blog would appear in the list of blogs I follow, in my blog). Would you know how I can do that??

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Nov 27, 2014 - 09:06 AM

      Hmm… There should be a follow button at the very top of the page for WordPress if you’re on a desktop. 🙂

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  18. mistermuse
    Nov 28, 2014 - 11:45 AM

    Didn’t see a “Like” button to click (and I don’t think marijuana is making me go blind), hence this comment in lieu of like. Actually I’d like to see an “Agree” button too (like WordPress would agree – well, maybe they would, like it or not).

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  19. quintdannager
    Dec 02, 2014 - 05:34 PM

    You missed one… It is not the job of government to protect us from ourselves. Individual voluntary action that does not violate anyone’s individual rights should never be illegal. If there is no force or fraud involved, and the participant is an adult, then there is no reason to declare the action a crime at all regardless of what the action is.

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Dec 06, 2014 - 11:35 AM

      Although I do tend to agree with you, I think there’s something you’re overlooking. We are so heavily interconnected that there’s not much that one can do without directly or indirectly affecting someone else. That being said, there are personal decisions that can drastically affect others (drunk driving) and there are other actions which bear little to none negative externalities and should therefore be regulated as opposed to banned.

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  20. One among Many
    Dec 06, 2014 - 01:07 PM

    Thanks for stopping by my blog. To me all the hooey about legalism of pot is this. All valid points made here. Main reason I am for it is if the country can have booze legal and all its done as far as the negative with it. Boils down to responsibility, why not pot. Can be safer driving high than drunk, I know this from years of it. The 70’s and 80’s were great consumption years for me. Back then I could buy a ounce for $10, heck usually was a ounce an half for the being a loyal customer. 🙂 And it was primo herb. Now with a quarter ounce $50 here and even not near top grade. I live in redneck country now sort of. What is going on in other places have no clue as the culture a it is now. So as far as it goes, there are both down sides for the two drugs as well as positive. Responsibility is the key word of it all. I have quit but that doesn’t mean anything. This is where I am at. A person is free to do what they want so fire it up. 🙂

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  21. Herschel
    Dec 10, 2014 - 05:34 PM

    This is an interesting subject.

    Should the U.S. also legalize other drugs? Why so, why not?

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  22. echoearmstrong
    Dec 12, 2014 - 06:35 PM

    …Love your site! Although I don’t even know how to smoke…I have been an advocate for the
    decriminalization of Maryjane for a very long time and am acutely aware of the medicinal benefits.

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  23. Chlea Faye
    Dec 13, 2014 - 09:45 AM

    agreed!!! I was so sad to see that Florida didn’t legalize it this year. We will deff get it next year! No doubt!

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  24. alt.truisms
    Dec 26, 2014 - 06:28 PM

    I hope it’s only a matter of time, the “war on drugs” needs to end. Thank you for following my blog. Look forward to sharing more with you. xoxo Anais

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  25. The kid with 1000 questions
    Dec 28, 2014 - 08:22 PM

    The generation that decided that this drug should be classified with heroin is almost gone. You present the same arguments we’ve been using for well over 40 years. Think about the lives ruined, imprisoned over POT! The money WASTED housing them. You’ve made a thorough presentation, but this is forgetting an important bartering tactic that may make the opposition actually change their minds. Make it worth their while. It’s politics, so anything goes, right? I don’t know why this hasn’t been mentioned in the media….they need to legalize it in every state, first thing tomorrow! Then have people sign up (get a permit?) in order to be allowed to purchase the marijuana. They, then know the size of the market. They can also know who is selling it, even overseas. A couple years later you make it illegal again. The state makes big cash taxing it while it’s legal, THEN it creates HUGE “municipal income” and job growth arresting, prosecuting, and building new prisons for all the buyers and sellers that won’t quit just because the law changes. Who knows (they love money)….it may remain legal. I disagree with the use, you suggest, of the extra funds. Knowing what the economic impact THIS would have, I would suggest a serious effort to pay off the national debt. If they don’t agree to it, likely, they know we’re going down, but haven’t told the regular folks, eh?

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  26. SaBiscuit
    Dec 31, 2014 - 10:55 PM

    Happy New Year, Manny. While I appreciate your opinion, my main problem with legalised marijuana use is that people will expose me to it by smoking it in my face, drive, or fly aircraft while under the influence. If it’s okay to use it, someone will do it for evil, regardless of the perceived benefits. Warm regards xoxo

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  27. mainbean
    Jan 02, 2015 - 04:57 PM

    Hello!! Great information and exciting comments! Would like to throw in a little monkey wrench… what about the kids of the stoners? Maybe not even the stoners lets just talk to children growing up in a home with use of drugs – even prescription drugs that change behaviors of the responsible adult.
    I am for the legalization of drugs, all drugs actually! We can’t stop anyone from using their freedom of choice – I am however concerned that the children in those homes don’t get to voice their opinion about the environment they are then forced to navigate. There are plenty of studies that show children if given a choice wouldn’t be around their intoxicated parents and most of us think a couple drinks is no big deal – but children are sensitive (not in a positive way) to the changes in behavior and character that the adult is usually looking for within intoxication.

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  28. Being I am a member of the “baby-boomer” generation, and have experimented with more than my fair-share of everything good, bad, and ugly; I vote for “medicinal only.” My rationale for this reasoning: Since I’m a cancer survivor, Kemo is an ugly thing.
    My vote against: How many children go without what they need because of parents that cannot or will not control their urges. I also feel strongly that pot is a “gateway” drug for irresponsible people no matter their age. Children also have a tendency to parrady their parents on a great many social issues.
    Of course, this is just my reasoning which works for me.
    Best,
    G.

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  29. jaimekleiman
    Jan 04, 2015 - 02:04 PM

    This is the first post I’ve read on your blog and it’s great. I do wish you’d included some references to support some of your statements (just to make a stronger case), but you’re preaching to the choir on this one. I’m a little confused by the Dutch woman’s argument, though. Not to sound like a flamer or a jerk, but why should the United States care about whether we detract tourism dollars from another country if we can get tremendous financial benefit for ourselves? That’s not really the way capitalism works and the US is a capitalist country.

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  30. BohoChickKy
    Jan 16, 2015 - 02:43 PM

    I would like to see it legalized, for sure. I wonder how many people out there, who want something to take the edge off, wind up becoming alcoholics simply because alcohol is legal. Drunkenness and alcoholism are far more destructive and damaging to health, as well as the psyche.

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Jan 16, 2015 - 11:42 PM

      You’ve raised a very thought-provoking point. Maybe in the coming years we’ll see alcoholism rates decline as a result of legalization. That would be truly fascinating!

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  31. Constanza
    Jan 19, 2015 - 02:10 PM

    Hihi here in Holland , marijuana is legal!

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  32. H Michelle
    Jan 22, 2015 - 02:13 PM

    I live in Barbados where ganja use/possession is quite illegal but this doesn’t stop it’s widespread use. It’s almost amusing to listen to the local debate (that is going nowhere, my opinion) between the hardliners on both sides of the coin, and ne’er the two shall meet.
    There really is no altruism in the US debate to legalize or not. It’s all about economics and, at this point in time, legalization suits “those that matter” and probably stand to benefit most, whereas legalization was not (or less) attractive (lucrative) previously. The reality is that we in small countries will just be swept along in the tide.
    There is no miracle substance (as touted by many) but if research revealed that ganja is mostly bad, would it stop the legalization drive? I doubt it. Even if ganja had been shown to be “all good” way back when, would the move to legalization have taken place then? Remember the “coconut oil” propaganda of decades past? It was all about the economics then too.
    Just hope that at the end of the day, whatever the motive, the outcome will be positive.
    Jamaica just approved legislation for debate on decriminalisation/legalisation. Waiting with baited breath to see what happens here in Barbados.
    By the way, I’m not a smoker….won’t likely, be even with decriminilisation/legalisation. I advocate responsible use of any substance.

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    • Manny Rutinel
      Jan 23, 2015 - 12:37 PM

      ” I’m not a smoker won’t likely be even with decriminalization/legalization. I advocate responsible use of any substance.”

      EXACTLY! This entire comment is very well said 🙂

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  33. Steve
    Jan 30, 2015 - 07:09 PM

    In general, i think the points you raise are valid. I wouldn’t agree that the health risks have yet to be proved though. Whgile I think that health risks are often overblown for political gain, overuse and abuse of the substance can and does lead to psychotic episodes in some predisposed brains, and can also affect the short term memory. That said, I think we need to be logical about drug use and legalisation. I think the biggest problem we face is not rhe substance itself (since there are many benefits to it), but the actual usage of it and the attitudes many have to it. The biggest issue we have here in South Australia is heavy recreational use. People will often use a substance like this because they are unhappy in their lives, and such heavy use not only is not respectful to a powerful natural opiate, but it also can lead to further unhappiness and issues such as psychosis and memory loss. I don’t have an issue with any substance, but I do have an issue with the lack of respect we give it.

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  34. XVIII
    Feb 16, 2015 - 11:59 AM

    You’ve outlined the pros to society as a whole, in which there are undoubtedly more of as opposed to the cons, but don’t you feel as if a decriminalization/legalization of the ‘drug’ would inevitably result in heavy taxation?

    Nice article btw 🙂

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  35. #Th3w3iRd0 a.k.a #KaazmikOddasee
    Mar 02, 2015 - 01:04 PM

    Great Post 🙂

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  36. Gemma Rose
    Apr 18, 2015 - 05:57 AM

    Good post, as someone who was originally against the legalisation of marijuana, my mind is slowly changing. Thank you also for following my blog, yours looks amazing. Respect.

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  37. Doylene Brents
    Dec 16, 2016 - 09:48 AM

    My main objection is that it would be a bad example for our children.

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  38. Irene Greiner
    Dec 24, 2016 - 08:59 PM

    I agree when it comes to the medicinal. Medical marijuana should be available to everyone who could benefit by it!

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  39. Jasmine Langdon
    Dec 26, 2016 - 06:02 PM

    I live in Australia, born and raised in New Zealand. Over here in Australia the government legalized medical marijuana back in November across the entire country for terminal and chronically ill people. You can get cannabis oil tablets but growing your own I believe is still illegal however the state South Australia has legalized entirely. New Zealand has strict laws and not legalized or decriminalized whatsoever which surprises me as New Zealand is usually ahead in many ways for a small country.

    The USA has improved a lot but I believe decriminalisation would be a great state. Too many people locked up over a class C drug that is really harmless. My specialist is reluctant to prescribe despite pain and sometimes nausea especially as it’s a new law and I vape or smoke at home occasionally. I no longer care it’s illegal and take the risk but I have long term cancer plus a broken shoulder which is taking forever to heal so that’s my excuse. Helps with the physical and mental pain without side effects. Over tramadol, endone etc.

    The issue is that the pharmaceutical companies make more money out of over the counter drugs and selling the medications for the side effects of those. If legal though they can still make money out of weed right? I really hate big pharm!

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  40. tony powers
    Jan 13, 2017 - 12:16 AM

    agree. I thank you for the “follow.” I shall endeavor to inform and amuse…and, above all, always try to be interesting. continue…

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  41. Doylene Brents
    Jan 18, 2017 - 12:05 AM

    I recently spent a week in Keystone CO. I was absolutely disgusted by the open use of Marijuana. The smell is just terrible. We were in a smoke free building thankfully but when we went out we could smell it everywhere. I voted to legalize it here in AR because I know people who really need it and I think it would be healthier than meds.

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  42. Steve Gordon
    Jan 19, 2017 - 01:38 PM

    I can only agree that the status should be changed away from Schedule 1, so that meaningful research can be done.

    MJ is addictive. I regularly see people whose lives have been destroyed by heavy use, they recognize that fact, and are powerless to stop.

    With long-term use, THC lowers the seizure threshold (so you get more seizures), worsens depression, lowers testosterone levels in men and women and thus ruins their sex lives, murders delta wave and REM sleep, and aggravates perception of pain.

    If you want to preach economic benefits, you haven’t figured in the long term cost to society of people who get and stay stoned and lose productivity, and there are a lot of those.

    The arguments for the legalization of marijuana are almost word-for-word what the English were telling the Chinese about opium.

    But, after all, there are 120-odd compounds in that leaf, and one of them at least will find a legit use. So we need to do good quality research, but we also need to tell the truth.

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